Human suffering in Darfur

By Alpha Furbell and Yahya Arko

There is a total collapse of law and order in Kutum, North Darfur. An eye witness from Kasab camp reported that the Sudanese government only protects Arab tribes in the region and is arming these tribes to kill and terrorize indigenous African inhabitants of the Darfur region; particularly those who were forced to leave their villages and are now live in Kasab camp.

“The Sudanese government and its Janjaweed militias come to the camp, they kill whoever they want to, rape whoever girl or women they want to, hit people with the gun stock and we do not have power to defend ourselves,” said Adam Musa who survived the horrendous attacks through telephone conversation from Kutum.

Adam said that the government supported militias. His mobile phone was taken by militia members when they raided the camp and that he rescued himself by crawling way and then running to Kutum town which about 35 km away.

‘’I left my family behind in the camp and I can’t go back because the camp is totally surrounded by armed militias,’’ he said.

The people of North Darfur suffer from a shortage in the supply of food, lack of clean drinking water and medicines intentionally engineered by the Sudanese government. This has resulted in the death of many innocent people. The situation has forced refugees to run away from the camp and many have poured into neighbouring Chad in a desperate effort to escape the genocidal activities of the Sudanese government and its supported militias.

A darfuri mother and her children stranded in refugee camp

Darfur, once the most peaceful place, has become one of the most dangerous and violent places on the planet. Looting, systemic killings, banditry, fighting between ethnic groups and continuing clashes between rebel groups and government forces throughout the region have become a daily habit. In July 2012 the Sudanese government forces launched deliberate attacks on the  internally displaced persons ( IDPs) camp known as the Kasab camp, located in the outskirt of Kutum town, North Darfur. In that attack more than 200 people including women and children were killed, over 500 were injured; some of the refugees were kidnapped by the Janjaweed militias. It was also reported that women were raped by both government forces and its supported Janjaweed militias. Those who resisted were shot to death.

Violent acts in Darfur started in 2000 when a group of Darfuris took arms against the Arab government in the north.  The Darfuris complained about the  lack of development, economic neglect, the failure of the government to provide basic development aid, schools, hospitals, roads, and other basic infrastructure, as well as systemic violation of the region`s basic human rights, and the refusal of the government in Khartoum to share power and wealth with the people of region. Since 2003 the Sudanese President Omar Bashir has supported the killings in Darfur and ordered some of his government ministers to personally oversee killings and displacement of Darfuris.

According to the United Nations and international human rights groups, there has been total carnage in Darfur since 2003 with more than  600,000 individuals,  most being women children having been killed. More than 4.5 million were forced to leave their villages. President Bashir and four of his ministers have been officially indicted by the International Criminal Court because of their direct role in crimes of genocide in Darfur.    So far Bashir has escaped arrest but he can’t leave the country because he will be arrested.

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One thought on “Human suffering in Darfur

  1. Pingback: [link] How to make the world better for girls in conflict areas « slendermeans

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